1987 Lamborghini Countach LP5000S QV

Coachwork by Bertone

There just aren’t any logical arguments for buying such a machine: what reasonable human being would want a car that’s so loud, uncomfortable and hard to get into? But, friends, let reasonable people ridicule and bitch – they merely haven’t driven a Lamborghini Countach Quattrovalvole, haven’t experienced the fascination for themselves.” A Road & Track test of the new car in 1985
 
The Lamborghini Countach LP5000S QV

The Lamborghini Countach was the baddest, scariest and, for most of its 16-year existence, the most politically incorrect motor car money could buy. Fast, loud, expensive and impractical, it graced the garages of heads of state, sports and rock stars and the business elite around the world. From its svelte, avant-garde LP400 ‘periscope’ form to its final incarnation as a pumped-up Testarossa-beater, the Countach never failed to turn heads or scare road-testers. It remains an icon of its era and probably the most daring supercar ever put into series production.

For Lamborghini to charge a hefty ten per cent premium for its latest Countach over Ferrari’s new Testarossa, it needed something special. The car that made its entrance at the 1985 Geneva Show was certainly that. Lamborghini’s engineers, having briefly considered supercharging, bored and stroked the mighty V12 to 5167cc – that was a start.

By also changing the carburettors and adding four-valve heads, power rocketed from 375bhp to 455bhp. The sheer flexibility of the big engine meant that even from under 30mph in top gear the car would gather pace like few others, on to a top speed of over 180mph.

It immediately became the fastest supercar in the world, comfortably beating Ferrari’s flagship Testarossa. Fast Lane editor Peter Dron took a new QV onto the autostrada, using the kilometre posts to time it. The results take your breath away:
 
We recorded a flying kilometre time in one direction of 11.46sec, which gives a speed of 195.2mph (314.1kph). The speedometer was indicating 199mph (320kph). In the opposite direction, a few minutes later, we went between the posts in 12.1sec, which is 184.9mph (297kmh.
 
This provides a mean opposite direction speed of 190.1mph (305.8kph).
 
Not only was the LP5000S QV the fastest flat out, it was also arguably the best Countach to drive, featuring myriad other mechanical improvements that boosted power and enhanced handling. And this was achieved without the added visual baggage of the Anniversary bodykit approved by Chrysler after their takeover of the Italian marque.

Often referred to as the ‘DD’ (downdraught, referring to its new Weber DNCF carburettors), this is the Countach which today's hedge fund managers dreamed of as impecunious teenagers. Its future is bright.
 
This Motor Car

This particular Countach 5000S QV was built in 1987, and delivered via famed importer Max Bobnar in May 1988 to first owner Juerg Klauser, of Birmensdorf in the canton of Zurich, Switzerland. It has spent its entire life in Switzerland.
 
Still in Klauser’s ownership, the service book shows stamps for regular maintenance periods at 5,000km (actually 6,900km, 14/1/1998) and 15,000km (14,818km, 20/8/2004). The Abgaswartungsdokument (Swiss emissions testing certificate) is stamped regularly, with just 18,987km recorded at 26 January 2010.
 
Acquired by the present collector owner in 2009 and driven only on special occasions since, its total mileage is 19,500km. It remains Swiss registered, is believed to be accident free and will be serviced by leading specialist Top Motors in Italy prior to delivery to its next owner.

We can think of no collectors’ motor car which offers better value for money and long-term future prospects – you heard it here first.