1965 Aston Martin DB5

As befits a car with such a famous name, handling is in the best race-nurtured tradition. It is absolutely effortless to drive and, although it must be classified as a sporting machine, such is the standard of luxury that one feels that even ‘grand touring’ is a somewhat inadequate term to describe this new breed of high-performance car.” Gregor Grant, Editor of Autosport on the new DB5.
 
Yes, it was the car made famous in the James Bond film Goldfinger, but the DB5 should also be remembered as one that set a standard to which all subsequent Astons have been measured. It was only produced from July 1963 until September 1965, with just 1021 built, of these 123 as Convertibles.
 
In essence, the DB5 was an evolution of the faired-in-headlight DB4 Series 5, this time with the 3,995cc engine of the Lagonda saloon. Early DB5s had the David Brown four-speed gearbox (all with overdrive) but this was soon replaced by a tough five-speed from German manufacturer ZF. Most cars carry the five-speed gearbox and a triple-SU carburettor engine.
 
It was an elegant GT, still referred to as a ‘Saloon’, and almost a four-seater, yet capable of nigh-on 150mph. The boot was roomy and the twin fuel tanks took some filling, endowing a DB5 travelling two-up with serious cross-country legs.
 
Caught in the perfect storm of never-waning interest in Bond and a worldwide collectors’ boom, the DB5 is one of the company’s most sought-after models, and values of DB5s have increased over 30-fold since 1994. It is the star performer of the K500 index.
 
The DB5 is the finest ‘David Brown Aston Martin’ and worthy of comparison with the best GTs of the period from Ferrari, Maserati and Lamborghini. Truly, a Gentleman’s Carriage.
 
This motor car
 
This 1965 Aston Martin DB5 is the definitive saloon model with triple SU carburettors and five-speed manual transmission.
 
Working from a completely stripped car, British marque experts Aston Workshop carried out a painstaking ‘nut and bolt’ restoration of ‘1735’, converting it to left-hand drive and engineering it to incorporate many modern conveniences such as air conditioning, electric power steering and a powerful Becker Mexico car audio, communication and navigation system.
 
The engine has been totally rebuilt with new forged aluminium pistons to 4.2-litre specification. This, combined with the longer gearing of the Tremec T5 five-speed transmission, endows the car with a relaxed touring pace, while the modern internals of the ’box make it both quieter and easier to change gear. Its discreet electric power steering is a godsend in busy city traffic, but never detracts from the enjoyment of stretching its legs on the open road.
 
Inside, the cabin has been retrimmed with the finest Bridge of Weir hides with matching black Wilton carpet. The suspension was totally rebuilt and the car runs on new, stainless steel wire wheels. A stainless steel exhaust and new aluminium oil and water radiators complete what has been the mission of making the ‘ultimate DB5’.
 
‘Q’ would certainly have approved.
 
Finished in iconic Silver Birch with all-new black leather interior, this DB5 is in quite perfect driving condition, retaining the charm of the original whilst offering every convenience necessary for driving on today’s roads. A mission to the Furka Pass and Andermatt await…

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