1965 Ferrari 275 GTS

Coachwork by Pininfarina

With the top down, all the extraneous noises disappear and one simply exults in the purr from those beautiful tailpipes. Sheer ecstasy” – Road & Track
 
Two, all-new Ferraris made their debuts at the 1964 Paris Salon. Alongside the potent 275 GTB, a berlinetta only one or two stages removed from Ferrari’s immortal GTO, sat the sybaritic 275 GTS, designed and built by Pininfarina, the first convertible in the company’s catalogue since the California Spider.
 
Both cars were powered by Colombo-designed, 3.3-litre V12s, the GTB’s appropriately slightly more highly tuned, at 280bhp, versus the GTS’s 260bhp. Their transmissions, though, were the same – and a radical departure for Ferrari road cars – being five-speed transaxles, improving weight distribution and increasing interior space. By adopting a higher final drive ratio, top speed of the 275 GTS was an almost identical 145mph. Its weight was only 80lb more than the berlinetta; truly, brothers in arms.
 
The new 275s also had independent rear suspension (developed from the 250 LM racing car) – another first for a Ferrari road car. The GTS ran on classic alloy-rimmed Borranis, while the GTB had, as standard, alloy wheels – innovation after innovation.
 
Inside the GTS, the lucky owner and his companion were treated to a modern yet typically ‘Ferrari’ cabin: Nardi, wood-rimmed wheel, two big dials for speedo and revs in a black binnacle, chromed air distribution and heating sliders, and the classic, open chromed gate and solid-as-a-rock gear lever. Contemporary road testers found it to be “a delightful machine on the road and as tight and free from wind noise as any convertible they’d ever experienced.”
 
American magazine Road & Track was unequivocal in its praise of the 275 GTS, titling its 1966 road test, "For Those Who Like Driving Owe Themselves at Least One of These". It recorded a zero to 60mph time of 7.2 seconds for the car, with a maximum of 144mph. The standing quarter was covered in just 15.7 seconds.
 
Only 200 examples of the 275 GTS were made, so buyers had to fight over every one, even at the reassuringly expensive list prices of the time. Today, the market appreciates the 275 GTS not only for its collectability, but also for its delectable, understated lines, ‘275’ connection, strong performance and sublime road manners.
 
Chassis 07563
 
The car offered was sold new through Chinetti Motors, New York, USA in 1965, to a specification of Rosso Cina (‘China Red’, paint code 20.456) with a black Franzi leather interior (code NR2). It carries the attractive, three engine compartment side vents distinctive of the model.
 
Since its first spell in North American ownership the car has since moved back to Europe, and is now registered in the United Kingdom. Following a recent inspection by marque expert Keith Bluemel, the evidence suggests that ‘07563’ had a recorded mileage of 38,000 miles in 1997, a figure which increased to 46,000 miles in 2007 and 46,819 in 2010. The latter is verified by a door sticker from official Ferrari service agent Autofficina Bonini of Cadelbosco di Sopra, just a figurative stone’s throw from Maranello.
 
Today, its odometer reads just 47,806 miles.
 
The car is presented in very original, good, ‘working’ condition, not ‘concours’ but neither incorrectly ‘improved’ nor ‘molested’ – or in need of restoration. Bluemel reports that the car has probably been repainted at some point in its life but in a shade close to the original. “Overall, the interior is in good condition,” while the seats “appear to be the original black leather with patina.” With the difficulty today of correctly replicating the look and feel of 1960s leather interiors, this is a massive plus.
 
On careful examination, Bluemel reports that the engine, chassis and transaxle number stampings match, hence the all-important Ferrari Classiche ‘Red Book’. Most components are to original specification, although the original fabric roof may well have been replaced some time in the car’s life.
 
With today’s market prizing originality and ‘no stories’ above all, this 1965 Ferrari 275 GTS represents an opportunity to buy a totally genuine car, in good working condition in the classic colour combination of red with black hide.
 
Ferrari Classiche-certified, ‘07563’ is ready to deliver ‘sheer ecstasy’ to its next owner this summer – one of Those Who Like Driving, obviously.

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