1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Long Nose Alloy Berlinetta

Coachwork by Pininfarina

Successor to the 250 Series and first seen in 1964, the Ferrari 275 embodied a number of technical innovations. While the chassis of the 275GTB berlinetta and 275GTS convertible followed Ferrari's established practice, for the first time on a road-going Ferrari there was independent rear suspension. Also new was the rear-mounted five-speed transaxle combining the gearbox and differential - the former now of the all-synchromesh type. Enlarged to 3.3 litres, the Colombo-designed 60-degree V12 engine produced 280bhp at 7,600rpm. A higher - 300bhp - state of tune employing six Weber carburettors was available, and this was used for the handful of aluminium-alloy bodied 275GTB/C (Competizione) models built, though customers purchasing a 275GTB for road use could also specify aluminium coachwork and/ or the six-carburettor engine.

Designed by Pininfarina and manufactured by Scaglietti, the 275GTB body is a true classic of sports car design. Yet despite the 275GTB's exquisite appearance, stylistic revisions were not long in coming: a longer nose, enlarged rear window and external boot hinges being introduced towards the end of 1965 all improved minor shortcomings.

This beautiful ‘long nose' 275GTB features desirable lightweight aluminium coachwork, an option available to performance minded clients, and left the factory liveried in Rosso Rubino (code 106-R-12) with black leather upholstery, destined for Ferrari’s US importer Luigi Chinetti for onward supply by dealer Otto Zipper Motors in Beverly Hills, California. The first owner is believed to have been a Beverly Hills doctor named Berman, who upon his retirement sold his three Ferraris through Zipper in October 1968. Chassis ‘08017’ was purchased by John H Peterson Jr of Long Beach, with whom it remained until 1986 when it had 31,000 original miles and retained its original paintwork. In a letter to next owner Massimo Sordi of Milan, Italy, dated 13th May 1986, Mr Peterson writes “The car has never been wrecked or abused in any way…The chassis, engine number all match…I have driven the car infrequently, and the majority of the time it has been garaged in my home in Palm Springs, California.” Interestingly, he also notes that “The colour is maroon on the exterior, and since it is the original paint, I’m sure you would eventually want to repaint the car. The interior is black, which is in excellent condition, except for the drivers seat which [like] the passengers seat has a black and white fabric, which is slightly frayed.”

Following importation to Italy the Ferrari was repainted Giallo Fly (how times change…) and again used sparingly by Sordi, who maintained a stable of thoroughbred classics including a Ferrari 250GT SWB California Spyder, before its sale to Commendatore Giuseppe Zannoni of Modena in 2003. The latter appeared to take little interest and sold the car only a year later to the present Italian owner, who has driven it little and done less still to it.

Italian registered, ASI certified and with an interesting history, this is a rare car with a lovely original specification and colour scheme to which perhaps a future owner will want to bring the car back. It would certainly be a focal point at any gathering of classic Ferraris in Rosso Rubino with black and white cloth centred seats and of course aluminium coachwork
.