Le Mans class winning and 6th overall

1932 MG ‘Montlhéry Midget’ C-Type

Few cars can claim to have taken part in the mythical 24 Hours of Le Mans, perhaps the most prestigious and romantic of all the grandes epreuves in motorsport history. Fewer still can claim to have achieved a victory, but this plucky little British car, a supercharged MG, did just that, taking home class honours in the 1933 running of the event and coming home, extraordinarily for a 750cc entrant, 6th overall behind a trio of Alfa Romeo 8C 2300s (the first co-driven by Tazio Nuvolari), a larger-engined Riley and an Aston Martin. It was MGs first ever and second highest finish at Le Mans and our car averaged 99km/hour in the hands of JL Ford and Maurice Baumer. Having already completed the Brooklands Mountain Handicap in 1932, other successes followed for CO291 including 3rd overall at the 1933 Isle of Man Mannin Beg; the Ards Ulster TT; the German Grand Prix (all the same year) and 10th overall in the 1936 Australian Grand Prix. More recently, following its repatriation from four decades spent quietly Down Under, the car belonged to well-respected collector Bill Ainscough and, for the past five years in the hands of an enthusiastic British couple, has successfully completed the 2010, 2011 and 2012 Mille Miglia. It is even accepted for the 2013 event.

Just 44 MG C-Types were built of which 9 were blown, making this a rarity even without its history. Presented in superb condition following a rebuild by pre-war MG experts Baynton Jones, as good as it can be in the words of its driver, retaining its original UK registration JK 2340 and with an unquestioned provenance unlike so many of its contemporaries, this eminently useable British hero of the golden age of Le Mans is absolutely rearing to go.